Pandoc   a universal document converter

About pandoc

If you need to convert files from one markup format into another, pandoc is your swiss-army knife. Pandoc can convert between the following formats:

(← = conversion from; → = conversion to; ↔ = conversion from and to)

Lightweight markup formats

Markdown (including CommonMark and GitHub-flavored Markdown)
reStructuredText
AsciiDoc
↔ Emacs Org-Mode
↔ Emacs Muse
Textile
txt2tags

HTML formats

↔ (X)HTML 4
↔ HTML5

Ebooks

EPUB version 2 or 3
FictionBook2

Documentation formats

GNU TexInfo
roff man
roff ms
Haddock markup

TeX formats

LaTeX
ConTeXt

XML formats

DocBook version 4 or 5
JATS
TEI Simple

Interactive notebook formats

↔ Jupyter notebook (ipynb)

Word processor formats

↔ Microsoft Word docx
↔ OpenOffice/LibreOffice ODT
OpenDocument XML
→ Microsoft PowerPoint

Page layout formats

InDesign ICML

Outline formats

OPML

Wiki markup formats

MediaWiki markup
DokuWiki markup
TikiWiki markup
TWiki markup
Vimwiki markup
XWiki markup
ZimWiki markup

Slide show formats

LaTeX Beamer
Slidy
reveal.js
Slideous
S5
DZSlides

Custom formats

→ custom writers can be written in lua.

PDF

→ via pdflatex, xelatex, lualatex, pdfroff, wkhtml2pdf, prince, or weasyprint.

Pandoc understands a number of useful markdown syntax extensions, including document metadata (title, author, date); footnotes; tables; definition lists; superscript and subscript; strikeout; enhanced ordered lists (start number and numbering style are significant); running example lists; delimited code blocks with syntax highlighting; smart quotes, dashes, and ellipses; markdown inside HTML blocks; and inline LaTeX. If strict markdown compatibility is desired, all of these extensions can be turned off.

LaTeX math (and even macros) can be used in markdown documents. Several different methods of rendering math in HTML are provided, including MathJax and translation to MathML. LaTeX math is converted (as needed by the output format) to unicode, native Word equation objects, MathML, or roff eqn.

Pandoc includes a powerful system for automatic citations and bibliographies, using pandoc-citeproc (which derives from Andrea Rossato’s citeproc-hs). This means that you can write a citation like

[see @doe99, pp. 33-35; also @smith04, ch. 1]

and pandoc will convert it into a properly formatted citation using any of hundreds of CSL styles (including footnote styles, numerical styles, and author-date styles), and add a properly formatted bibliography at the end of the document. Many forms of bibliography database can be used, including bibtex, RIS, EndNote, ISI, MEDLINE, MODS, and JSON citeproc. Citations work in every output format.

There are many ways to customize pandoc to fit your needs, including a template system and a powerful system for writing filters.

Pandoc includes a Haskell library and a standalone command-line program. The library includes separate modules for each input and output format, so adding a new input or output format just requires adding a new module.

Pandoc is free software, released under the GPL. Copyright 2006–2019 John MacFarlane.

pandoc conversions